Wellness – A Way of Living

Turning Good Intentions into Action

The Nature of Your Mind

The Nature of Our Mind

In Zen it is thought that there are two levels of mind: the everyday mind and the Big Sky mind. The everyday mind, is our normal waking consciousness. It is the constant self-dialogue going on affirming the nature of your life.   It constantly tells your story; the memories, thoughts, plans, desires, and resentments that make up your life.  Behind this everyday mind is the Big Sky mind – serene, tranquil, and simply observing.  The everyday mind, in its attempts to analyze, think, process and figure things out, is like clouds obscuring your view of the sky.  By quieting the thoughts, we dispel the clouds and the expansiveness of the open sky appears.

In  meditation, one learns to rest in Big Sky mind.  The focus of meditation is to first quiet the ordinary mind.  Engaging in a practice of following and counting your breaths, letting go of thoughts as they arise, and eventually resting in Big Sky mind.

Meditation as a practice to quiet your ordinary mind is difficult and requires an effort.  The practice of focusing exclusively on your breathing and learning to let go of your thoughts as they arise is a challenge because our minds are so attuned to processing and analyzing our everyday world that to simply stop them when we need to, requires discipline.  One way to develop that discipline is to have a focal point such as our breathing, and as thoughts arise, we simply let go of them by refocusing on our breathing.  It is not that you can ever stop the mind from thinking, that is what it does, but with practice you can learn to not follow your thoughts; simply notice them and return to your breathing. 

 In meditation you become aware of the impossibility of stopping thoughts, so the goal is to not follow the thoughts when they arise.  One way to stop yourself from following your thoughts is to note what’s happening by saying “thinking” in your mind; note it and go back to focusing on your breathing.

You will come to know the nature of your mind by this practice.

You will see how just trying to sit quietly for ten minutes without interruptions from your mind is quite impossible.  At first this is a bit aggravating, and it seems you are constantly saying “thinking” and ” how can this be peaceful?”  But with practice you learn to pay less and less attention to these thoughts.  After a period of time you begin to see how weak these thoughts are, and you pull your attention to a deeper place wherein you are neither disturbed nor distracted by these demanding thoughts.

Be gentle with yourself and try not to judge your experience.  Just be with your experience.

Taking time to meditate that 5 or 10 minutes is an excellent practice to get into; however the practice of focusing on your breathing and letting go of thoughts is beneficial at other times of the day when you are not meditating.  When you are obsessing on a thought, or wrestling with some issue throughout the day, your practice in meditation of not following the thoughts really pays off.  This is a skill that we can call upon throughout our day.

As an example, many of us have certain activities that we engage in that always seem to trigger our issues.  It’s common that tiring activities, such as tedious household chores, trigger scenarios of the events of our life.  This is when we are particularly disposed to repressed anger and resentment issues that seem to demand our attention, with the resultant negative energy serving only to throw us off-balance.  This is when the practice of letting go of issues as they arise, developed in your meditation practice, is of real value in your everyday life. 

How long you do your meditation is not as important as simply doing it.  If you only have a few minutes, five or ten, do it anyway.  Eventually you might build up to twenty minutes, but don’t force yourself at the start.  This should not be seen as one more chore/task but a way to relieve your “thinking” mind and bring you back to balance.

There are numerous meditation styles, such as sitting, walking, or standing.  Which one you choose is dependent on your own comfort.  Once the basic technique, (focusing on your breathing; letting go of your thoughts) is learned, it can be applied in endless variations. 

 Walking meditation is a popular form and is particularly helpful for those who have difficulty sitting.  With Walking meditation, we are not walking to get somewhere; we want to learn to be with the walking experience.  It is good to slow down your pace and synchronize your breathing with your steps.  Find your natural rhythm.  When thoughts arise, dismiss them and return to matching your breathing with your steps.  Become conscious of your connection to the earth.  Feel her beneath your feet.  You can slow down your pace and note the separate sensations of walking itself.  Be present with all aspects of your experience.

Gardening Meditation is one activity that is very favourable for practicing mindfulness.  Stand back from the garden and observe it and listen to it.  Be willing to be the garden’s servant, tending to its needs.  What activity are you drawn to while simply observing the garden with openness?  Weeding, planting, pruning, watering?  What calls out to you?

As you approach the activity you are drawn to, stay in your mindfulness practice.  Tend to your breathing, dismiss thoughts and surrender to the needs of the situation in front of you.  Try not to willfully do the activity in front of you.  Instead, form a relationship with the activity.  Let the plants and the garden inform you what needs to be done.  Gardening in this way can be a wonderful affirmation of the interconnectedness of all life.

From meditation learn to become mindful with all your activities.

Michelle Potvin H.T. Coun.,

Wellness – A Way of Living

(Connect & Contact on Linked in – http://ca.linkedin.com/in/michellepotvin)

Wellness, a state of mind, body and spirit!

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2010/11/10 - Posted by | Behaviours, Change, Lifestyle, Mindfulness, Stress, Wellness | , , , , , , , ,

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